Alkalinity FAQs:


Q: Is alkalinity the capacity of water to resist changes in pH that would make the water more acidic?

A: Yes.

Q: Is alkalinity modeled and quantified with respect to the CO2 equivalence point?

A: Yes.

Q: Is alkalinity the hydronium cations which exist to balance electrically the increase in calcium anions in deep ocean water?

A: Yes, although now the meaning alkalinity has expanded.

Q: Is alkalinity measured with respect to the CO2 equivalence point?

A: Yes, and the dissolution of CO2, although it adds acid and dissolved inorganic carbon, does not change the alkalinity.

Q: Is alkalinity sometimes incorrectly used interchangeably with basicity?

A: Yes.

Q: Is alkalinity the strength of a buffer solution composed of weak acids and their conjugate bases?

A: Yes.

Q: Is alkalinity measured by adding a strong acid until all the anions listed above are converted to uncharged species?

A: Yes.

Q: Is alkalinity primarily a term used by oceanographers it is also used by hydrologists?

A: Yes.

Q: Is alkalinity typically reported as mg/L as CaCO3?

A: Yes.

Q: Is alkalinity equal to the stoichiometric sum of the bases in solution?

A: Yes.

Q: Is alkalinity a concentration value?

A: Yes, and increasing the volume would theoretically serve to decrease AT.

Q: Is alkalinity expressed in units of meq/L?

A: Yes, and which corresponds to the amount of monoprotic acid added as a titrant in millimoles per liter.

Q: Is alkalinity important in determining a stream's ability to neutralize acidic pollution from rainfall or wastewater?

A: Yes.

Q: Is alkalinity relatively stable, so significant changes can only occur over long time scales?

A: Yes, As a result, seasonal and annual variability is generally very low.