Airspeed FAQs:


Q: Is airspeed the speed of an aircraft relative to the air?

A: Yes.

Q: Is airspeed all equal?

A: Yes.

Q: Is airspeed closely related to the indicated airspeed shown by the airspeed indicator?

A: Yes.

Q: Is airspeed ordinarily accomplished on board an aircraft by an airspeed indicator connected to a pitot-static system?

A: Yes.

Q: Is airspeed equivalent airspeed that is corrected for pressure altitude and temperature?

A: Yes, The result is the true physical speed of the aircraft relative to the surrounding body of air.

Q: Is airspeed a useful speed for structural testing?

A: Yes.

Q: Is airspeed simply what is read off of an airspeed gauge connected to a pitot static system?

A: Yes, and calibrated airspeed is indicated airspeed adjusted for pitot system position and installation error, and equivalent airspeed is calibrated airspeed adjusted for compressibility effects.

Q: Is airspeed equal?

A: Yes.

Q: Is airspeed indicated airspeed?

A: Yes, and calibrated airspeed , equivalent airspeed , true airspeed , and density airspeed.

Q: Is airspeed derived from the difference between the ram air pressure from the pitot tube?

A: Yes, or stagnation pressure, and the static pressure.

Q: Is airspeed typically within a few knots of indicated airspeed?

A: Yes, while equivalent airspeed decreases slightly from CAS as aircraft altitude increases or at high speeds.

Q: Is airspeed equivalent airspeed adjusted for air density?

A: Yes, and is also the speed of the aircraft through the air in which it is flying.

Q: Is airspeed a function of the compressible impact pressure?

A: Yes.

Q: Is airspeed that?

A: Yes, and at Mach numbers below the onset of wave drag, all of the aerodynamic forces and moments on an aircraft are proportional to the square of the equivalent airspeed.