Aircraft FAQs:


Q: Is an aircraft a machine that is able to fly by gaining support from the air?

A: Yes.

Q: Was an aircraft of the NASA X-43A Pegasus, a scramjet-powered, hypersonic, lifting body experimental research aircraft, at Mach 9.6?

A: Yes, The X-43A set that new mark, and broke its own world record on its third and final flight on Nov.

Q: Is an aircraft the kite?

A: Yes.

Q: Is an aircraft a small unmanned type made to fly for fun?

A: Yes, for static display, for aerodynamic research or for other purposes.

Q: Is an aircraft in general characterized by their wing configuration?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a aircraft produced in several different types optimized for various uses?

A: Yes, military aircraft, which includes not just combat types but many types of supporting aircraft, and civil aircraft, which include all non-military types, experimental and model.

Q: Is an aircraft not designed for combat as their primary function?

A: Yes, but may carry weapons for self-defense.

Q: Is an aircraft the Soviet/Russian MiG-25—capable of Mach 3.2 , at the expense of engine damage, or Mach 2.83 normally—and the Russian MiG-31E?

A: Yes, Both are fighter-interceptor jet airplanes, in active operations as of 2016.

Q: Is an aircraft one that has not been fully proven in flight?

A: Yes, or that carries an FAA airworthiness certificate in the "Experimental" category.

Q: Is an aircraft powered heavier-than-air types?

A: Yes.

Q: Is an aircraft lift supporting it in the air and drag opposing its motion?

A: Yes.

Q: Is an aircraft toys?

A: Yes, and and—even smaller -- nano-aircraft.

Q: Is an aircraft aircraft designed to destroy enemy equipment using its own armament?

A: Yes.

Q: Is an aircraft any aircraft that is operated by a legal or insurrectionary armed service of any type?

A: Yes.

Q: Is an aircraft flown by an onboard pilot?

A: Yes, but unmanned aerial vehicles may be remotely controlled or self-controlled by onboard computers.

Q: Is an aircraft often variants of civil aircraft?

A: Yes.

Q: Is an aircraft testing new aerospace technologies?

A: Yes, though the term also refers to amateur and kit-built aircraft—many based on proven designs.

Q: Is a aircraft designed according to many factors such as customer and manufacturer demand?

A: Yes, and safety protocols and physical and economic constraints.

Q: Is an aircraft stiff enough to share much of the flight loads?

A: Yes.

Q: Is an aircraft called aviation?

A: Yes.