Twin FAQs:


Q: Are twins two offspring produced by the same pregnancy?

A: Yes.

Q: Are twins formed after a blastocyst essentially collapses?

A: Yes, and splitting the progenitor cells in half, leaving the same genetic material divided in two on opposite sides of the embryo.

Q: Are twins born weighing less than 5.5 pounds , while the average birth weight of a healthy baby should be around 6–8 pounds?

A: Yes, This is largely due to the fact that twins are typically born premature.

Q: Is a twin fertilized by its own sperm cell?

A: Yes.

Q: Are twins endangered by this condition?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a twin not reabsorbed?

A: Yes.

Q: Are twins common in many animal species?

A: Yes, and including cats, sheep, ferrets, giant pandas, dogs, deer, marmosets, and tamarins.

Q: Is a twin endangered when the other zygote becomes cancerous?

A: Yes, or molar.

Q: Were twins always two zygotes?

A: Yes.

Q: Are twins now evaluated for surgery to attempt to separate them into separate functional bodies?

A: Yes.

Q: Are twins analyzed for 506,786 single nucleotide polymorphisms known to occur in human population?

A: Yes, and nalyzed for 506,786 single nucleotide polymorphisms known to occur in human populations.

Q: Are twins indeed mirror image?

A: Yes.

Q: Was a twin miscarried but the other was able to be carried to term?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a twin being diverted into the other twin?

A: Yes.

Q: Are twins referred to as doppelgangers?

A: Yes.

Q: Are twins genetically nearly identical and they are always the same sex unless there has been a mutation during development?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a twin not head down a caesarean section is often recommended?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a twin head first and the second is not?

A: Yes.

Q: Are twins dizygotic?

A: Yes.

Q: Are twins uniformly distributed in all populations around the world?

A: Yes.

Q: Are twins head down a trial of vaginal delivery is recommended at between 37 and 38 weeks?

A: Yes.

Q: Are twins epigenetic modification?

A: Yes, and caused by differing environmental influences throughout their lives.

Q: Were twins monozygotic?

A: Yes.

Q: Are twins also more common for older mothers?

A: Yes, and with twinning rates doubling in mothers over the age of 35.

Q: Are twins born with different sexes it is because of chromosomal defects?

A: Yes.

Q: Were twins both found to be chimeras and to share all of their maternal DNA but only half of their father's DNA?

A: Yes.

Q: Are twins either dizygotic or monozygotic?

A: Yes, Less common variants are discussed further down the article.