Scientific Method FAQs:


Q: Is a scientific method a body of techniques for investigating phenomena?

A: Yes, and acquiring new knowledge, or correcting and integrating previous knowledge.

Q: Is a scientific method often presented as a fixed sequence of steps?

A: Yes, and it represents rather a set of general principles.

Q: Is a scientific method not a single recipe: it requires intelligence?

A: Yes, and imagination, and creativity.

Q: Is a scientific method thus what make it well suited for identifying such persistent systematic errors?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a scientific method iterative?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a scientific method the process by which science is carried out?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a scientific method best suited to theoretical research, which in turn should not be trammeled by the other methods and practical ends?

A: Yes, reason's "first rule" is that, in order to learn, one must desire to learn and, as a corollary, must not block the way of inquiry.

Q: Is a scientific method an iterative?

A: Yes, and cyclical process through which information is continually revised.

Q: Is a scientific method more than resistant or tough – it actually benefits from such randomness in many ways?

A: Yes, Taleb believes that the more anti-fragile the system, the more it will flourish in the real world.

Q: Is a scientific method used to expand the frontiers of knowledge?

A: Yes, and research into areas that are outside the mainstream will yield most new discoveries.

Q: Is a scientific method often presented as a fixed sequence of steps?

A: Yes, and these actions are better considered as general principles.

Q: Is a scientific method subject to peer review for possible mistakes?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a scientific method yester-year's debate?

A: Yes, and the continuation of which can be summed up as yet more of the proverbial deceased equine castigation.

Q: Is a scientific method employed not only by a single person?

A: Yes, but also by several people cooperating directly or indirectly.