Life Expectancy FAQs:


Q: Is a life expectancy a statistical measure of the average time an organism is expected to live?

A: Yes, and based on the year of their birth, their current age and other demographic factors including sex.

Q: Is a life expectancy defined statistically as the mean number of years remaining for an individual or a group of people at a given age?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a life expectancy one of the factors in measuring the Human Development Index of each nation along with adult literacy?

A: Yes, and education, and standard of living.

Q: Is a life expectancy often cited as demonstrating the need for better medical care or increased social support?

A: Yes.

Q: Was a life expectancy only about 35 years?

A: Yes, and largely because infant and child mortality remained high.

Q: Was a life expectancy under 25 years in the early Colony of Virginia?

A: Yes, and in seventeenth-century New England, about 40 per cent died before reaching adulthood.

Q: Is a life expectancy not synonyms?

A: Yes.

Q: Was a life expectancy 35 years' they often interpret this as meaning that people of that time or place had short maximum life spans?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a life expectancy considerably higher than that of males?

A: Yes.

Q: Was a life expectancy 21?

A: Yes, but by the age of 5, it jumped to 42.

Q: Is a life expectancy also used in describing the physical quality of life of an area or?

A: Yes, for an individual when the value of a life settlement is determined a life insurance policy sold for a cash asset.

Q: Is a life expectancy the age-specific death rates of the population members?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a life expectancy genetic disorders?

A: Yes, and drug use, tobacco smoking, excessive alcohol consumption, obesity, access to health care, diet and exercise.

Q: Is a life expectancy the mean number of years of life remaining at a given age?

A: Yes, and assuming age-specific mortality rates remain at their most recently measured levels.

Q: Is a life expectancy at birth?

A: Yes, and which can be defined in two ways: while cohort LEB is the mean length of life of an actual birth cohort and can be computed only for cohorts born many decades ago, so that all their members died, period LEB is the mean length of life of a hypothetical cohort assumed to be exposed since birth until death of all their members to the mortality rates observed at a given year.

Q: Is a life expectancy particularly notable in many African countries?

A: Yes.

Q: Was a life expectancy 63 in 1990?

A: Yes, and 57 in 2000, and 58 in 2011.

Q: Is a life expectancy an average?

A: Yes, and a particular person may die many years before or many years after the "expected" survival.

Q: Is a life expectancy also used in plant or animal ecology?

A: Yes, life tables. The term life expectancy may also be used in the context of manufactured objects, but the related term shelf life is used for consumer products, and the terms "mean time to breakdown" and "mean time between failures" are used in engineering.

Q: Was a life expectancy 60 in 1990?

A: Yes, and 43 in 2000, and 54 in 2011.

Q: Is a life expectancy also likely to be affected by exposure to high levels of highway air pollution or industrial air pollution?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a life expectancy by definition an arithmetic mean?

A: Yes.

Q: Is a life expectancy merely another manifestation of the general rule?

A: Yes, and seen in all mammal species, that larger individuals tend, on average, to have shorter lives.

Q: Is a life expectancy an average that is computed over all people including those who die shortly after birth?

A: Yes, and those who die in early adulthood in childbirth or in wars, and those who live unimpeded until old age, and lifespan is an individual-specific concept and maximum lifespan is an upper bound rather than an average.