Elevator FAQs:


Q: Is an elevator in the works of the Roman architect Vitruvius?

A: Yes, and who reported that Archimedes built his first elevator probably in 236 BC.

Q: Is an elevator essentially a platform that is either pulled or pushed up by a mechanical means?

A: Yes.

Q: Were elevators refined in the ensuing decade?

A: Yes, – in 1835, an innovative elevator called the "Teagle" was developed by the company Frost and Stutt in England.

Q: Were elevators significantly enhanced by Frank Sprague who added floor control?

A: Yes, and automatic elevators, acceleration control of cars, and safeties.

Q: Were elevators available?

A: Yes, but passengers were reluctant to use them.

Q: Are elevators used as part of urban transport systems?

A: Yes.

Q: Is an elevator going up or down either before or after the doors open?

A: Yes, and usually in conjunction with the lanterns lighting up.

Q: Is an elevator displayed?

A: Yes.

Q: Is an elevator pneumatic?

A: Yes, and it allows for only 1 person.

Q: Are elevators typically larger and capable of carrying heavier loads than a passenger elevator?

A: Yes, and generally from 2,300 to 4,500 kg.

Q: Was an elevator built by Werner von Siemens in 1880 in Germany?

A: Yes.

Q: Is an elevator descending faster than its maximum designed speed?

A: Yes, if this happens, the device causes copper brake shoes to clamp down along the vertical rails in the shaft, stopping the elevator quickly, but not so abruptly as to cause injury.

Q: Are elevators used as a city transport along with funiculars?

A: Yes.

Q: Was an elevator belt-driven and used a counterweight for extra power?

A: Yes.

Q: Is an elevator designed to move people between a building's floors?

A: Yes.

Q: Is an elevator a special purpose passenger elevator used infrequently?

A: Yes, and which is exempt from many commercial regulations and accommodations.

Q: Were elevators developed in the 1970s?

A: Yes, and use a pair of above ground cylinders, which makes it practical for environmentally or cost sensitive buildings with two, three, or four floors.

Q: Are elevators configured to remain open at the floor until they are required to move again?

A: Yes.

Q: Was an elevator destroyed in 1943 and rebuilt in 1954?

A: Yes.

Q: Are elevators typically controlled from the outside by a call box?

A: Yes, and which has up and down buttons, at each stop.

Q: Are elevators dispatched one-by-one when they reach a pre-determined passenger load?

A: Yes, or when they have had their doors opened for a certain period of time.

Q: Are elevators available in capacities from 500 to 2,700 kg in 230 kg increment?

A: Yes, and vailable in capacities from 500 to 2,700 kg in 230 kg increments.

Q: Are elevators used within buildings or areas with limited space?

A: Yes, and generally to move cars into the parking garage or manufacturer's storage.

Q: Are elevators usually slower than traction elevators?

A: Yes.

Q: Are elevators used to move materials between a basement and a ground-level area?

A: Yes, and often the sidewalk just outside the building.

Q: Was an elevator installed at 488 Broadway in New York City on March 23?

A: Yes, and 1857.

Q: Was an elevator offered commercially in Argentina?

A: Yes.

Q: Are elevators Italy?

A: Yes, and with more than 1,629 million euros of sales and 1,224 million euros of internal market.

Q: Is an elevator part of a building?

A: Yes, and it must also comply with building code standards relating to earthquake resilience, fire standards, electrical wiring rules and so forth.

Q: Was an elevator reasonably close to the landing point?

A: Yes.

Q: Are elevators tested using the ASME A17?

A: Yes.

Q: Are elevators dictated according to various standards?

A: Yes, and which may be international, national, state, regional or city based.

Q: Are elevators required to conform to the American Society of Mechanical Engineers' Standard A17?

A: Yes.

Q: Is an elevator leaving the floor?

A: Yes.

Q: Is an elevator a self-ascending elevator with its own propulsion?

A: Yes.

Q: Are elevators synchronized by a light signal in the car?

A: Yes.

Q: Is an elevator recalled?

A: Yes, and it proceeds to the recall floor and stops with its doors open.

Q: Are elevators designed so that most of the components fit within the shaft containing the elevator car?

A: Yes, and a small cabinet houses the elevator controller.

Q: Are elevators required to conform to the Americans with Disabilities Act and other State and Federal civil rights legislation regarding accessibility?

A: Yes.

Q: Are elevators required to conform to ASME A17?

A: Yes.

Q: Were elevators installed before Sprague sold his company to the Otis Elevator Company in 1895?

A: Yes.

Q: Are elevators built so that their cars always move synchronously in opposite directions?

A: Yes, and are each other's counterweight.

Q: Are elevators installed in Arkhangelskoye near Moscow?

A: Yes.

Q: Are elevators still not allowed by the ASME A17 code in the US?

A: Yes.

Q: Were elevators located in the palace buildings of England and France?

A: Yes.

Q: Are elevators more energy efficient for the work of freight lifting?

A: Yes.

Q: Is an elevator placed on independent service?

A: Yes, and it will no longer respond to hall calls.

Q: Are elevators used in guyed masts or towers?

A: Yes, and in order to make easy access to parts of these constructions, such as flight safety lamps for maintenance.

Q: Were elevators operated with steam power and were used for moving goods in bulk in mines and factories?

A: Yes.

Q: Are elevators used in the Taipei 101 office tower?

A: Yes.

Q: Are elevators cheaper?

A: Yes, but installing cylinders greater than a certain length becomes impractical for very-high lift hoistways.

Q: Are elevators a candidate for mass customization?

A: Yes.

Q: Was an elevator built by Ivan Kulibin and installed in Winter Palace in 1793?

A: Yes.

Q: Is an elevator somewhat similar to one type still used today?

A: Yes.

Q: Is an elevator currently serving traffic in a certain direction?

A: Yes, and it will only answer calls in the same direction unless there are no more calls beyond that floor.

Q: Is an elevator the paternoster?

A: Yes, and a constantly moving chain of boxes.

Q: Are elevators often used in industrial and agricultural applications?

A: Yes.

Q: Were elevators controlled by switches operated by pulling on adjacent ropes?

A: Yes.

Q: Are elevators designed for much greater capacity than other elevators?

A: Yes, and up to 91,000 kg of aircraft and equipment.

Q: Is an elevator a special type of freight elevator?

A: Yes.

Q: Are elevators built to provide about 30 to 40 years of service?

A: Yes, as long as service intervals specified and periodic maintenance/inspections by the manufacturer are followed.

Q: Are elevators generally required to display a written notice in the car that the use by passengers is prohibited?

A: Yes, though certain freight elevators allow dual use through the use of an inconspicuous riser.

Q: Is an elevator powered by a motor driving a pinion gear?

A: Yes.

Q: Are elevators led by the need for movement of raw materials including coal and lumber from hillsides?

A: Yes.

Q: Was an elevator allowed to move?

A: Yes.

Q: Is an elevator often permitted to be of lower cost and complexity than full commercial elevators?

A: Yes.

Q: Are elevators not run using standard emergency power systems?

A: Yes.

Q: Are elevators smaller than commercial elevators?

A: Yes.

Q: Is an elevator surrounded by an aquarium?

A: Yes.

Q: Are elevators extremely safe?

A: Yes.