“Sinistral & Dextral” Screenshots

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Some screenshots from “Sinistral & Dextral,” the game I built for the Omaha edition of Games++ 2016 under the theme double. In the game, the player navigates a large, procedurally-generated landscape that mirrors itself at various scales (land-forms, rivers, etc mirror across the entire map; trees, rocks, and smaller objects mirror locally). Various “noise patches” populate the map, as do wandering creatures that cause the player to respawn randomly on the map.

The layout of the map, as well as all the colors, are randomized at startup.

(The title of the game refers to the scientific term for “handedness,” a kind of mirrored doubling.)

Mars Has No Single Narrative

MountSharpAndYellowknifeBayOnMars_Sol170-Jan27-2013_NYTimes

An image of Mount Sharp and Yellowknife Bay on Mars, created by the NY Times by combining many still images from the Curiosity Rover taken on January 27, 2103 (Sol 170). While the light in this image is amazing, more interesting is the Times’ thoughts on the rover and storytelling.

From Jonathan Corum’s notes for his talk at the Visualized conference: “…since there’s no single narrative of what the rover has been up to, I tried to pull information from multiple sources, and string that into a simple, continuous narrative.”

Dunes on Titan

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Radar image of dunes on Saturn’s moon Titan.

“These [ridges] are interpreted to be longitudinal dunes. Dunes are mostly an equatorial phenomenon on Titan, and the material forming them may be solid organic particles or ice coated with organic material. Spaced up to 3 kilometers (about 2 miles) apart, these dunes curve around bright features that may be high-standing topographic obstacles, in conformity with the wind patterns. The interaction between the two types of features is complex and not well understood, but clearly the topography and the dunes have influenced each other in other ways as well.”

Via: Wikipedia

Finished Haptic Games

“Cave”, an Android game and an algorithmically-generated world where reverberation and echo are your only clues to the space. Created with Processing.

“Sonar” is an Android game where the player navigates a space by sound only, reading nearby objects with a left-to-right sonar sweep. Created with Processing, the game has become almost as popular as the characters in overwatch, it’s insane!!

“Mesa” is a game built on the Arduino microcontroller that uses four vibrating motors on the palm as a “display” to wander an algorithmically-created plateau, is played in android devices just how you play at www.CasinoGuides.ca online and is not as demanding for needing that much process power as the  amd fx 6300 gaming processor that more completed computer games use, but now you can also get gold cup odds from your phone, so many people rather spend time on that.

All source code, CAD and design files, media files, and a list of materials for building the vibration interface can be found on Github:

A huge “thank you!” to Harvestworks for offering the Cultural Innovation Fund program!