Blurred leaves

blurredLeaves

Found this today while looking through some photographs.  I love the blur when you shake the iPhone while taking pictures.

Images of molecules

Using a specially-designed microscope under extreme vacuum and low temperature, and a measuring tip smaller than the size of an atom, scientists were able to get very clear images of molecules.  This technique, known as non-contact atomic force microscopy (I think I often strive for the titles of my pieces to be as clear as the names of scientific processes, but that’s another post altogether) is covered in this article on the Royal Society of Chemistry site.  The above image is a pentacene molecule on a copper surface.

The technique works without touching the molecule – instead (as I understand it) there is an overlap of the electrons between the sensing tip and the molecule itself.  Energy is exchanged and recorded, that data is then translated into an image.  In a way, this is a lot like traditional photography, where the camera doesn’t touch the object but records light bouncing off of it.  Maybe we need consumer-level imaging devices that aren’t light-based, but record other types of energy.

Via: Make blog

Sounds of nuclei

An interesting, if diffcult to understand, article on listening to the nuclei of atoms using NMR Spectroscopy by Prof. Dr. Water Bauer at the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg.  While the science is complicated, the electronics to listen in are not.

How difficult is it to modify an existing spectrometer for auditory FID monitoring? If you are familiar with electronics it takes not more than half an hour of soldering and wiring.

According to the block diagram, just splice in two wires and plug them into a stereo.  Of course, you need the machine above, but who doesn’t have one of those, right?  The sound below is CH3CHO (found in coffee and ripe fruit, and is believed to be the chemical that causes hangovers), sampled four different times.

Via: Auditory Presentation of Free Induction Decay (FID) Signals Generated by NMR Spectrometers