Tutorial: Node on Raspberry Pi (for Bots)


Almost all my bots have been written in Python, but I’ve been meaning to try Node.js for more interactive bots for some time. Daniel Shiffman’s excellent new tutorials were enough to get my jump-started, and I created @BotSuggestion, a bot whose only activity is following accounts suggested by Twitter, slowly conforming to their algorithm.

I run all my bots on a Raspberry Pi under my desk (see my tutorial on how to get that set up), but getting an ongoing Node server running took a little more work.

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Junk Mail/Artist Book


An amazing thing arrived unsolicited in the mail yesterday. It included the above items: a fake email printout from a boss to a sales person telling them to buy my car, a fake handwritten note at the bottom to me, and a fake handwritten note on fake legal pad paper.

It’s pretty easy to see through this and realize it’s junk mail, but the overall complexity of the package, the way my name and the make/model of my car is integrated, makes for a pretty amazing object. This will certainly be added to my collection of algorithmically-generated artist books and ephemera.

SDR/HackRF One: Mac Setup and Basics


The HackRF One is a very nice software-defined radio (SDR). Though a good bit more expensive than other SDR hardware, it is very well made and Michael Ossmann of Great Scott Gadgets has put together an extensive set of free video tutorials. Of course, those only help if you have everything set up correctly to begin with.

It appears that most SDR work is done through Linux, which makes sense: SDR is classic hardware/software hacking. But for a Mac user, I found it somewhat difficult to get started. This short tutorial will hopefully help kickstart that process for you!

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